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Workwrite Resumes

Your LinkedIn profile should align with your resume, although the two should not be exactly the same. The work history listed in your profile should definitely match up with your resume — this is an easy check for prospective employers to make. However, your profile should complement — not duplicate — your resume. The most important pieces of your LinkedIn profile are your profile Headline

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How do you get your resume into the hands of a recruiter? The simplest answer is: Many times, recruiters will find you. If you have an up-to-date profile on LinkedIn and a desirable list of skills, it’s not unusual for you to be contacted by a recruiter who would like to place you with a client company. LinkedIn is also a great way to locate

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Applying for positions — whether advertised or unadvertised — is the top use for your resume once you have it. But it’s certainly not the last item on your “to do” list. Working with a recruiter may be one strategy you consider in your job search. You may be approached by a recruiter (sometimes called a “headhunter”), or you may wish to make contact yourself.

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The simplest way to start your company research is on a search engine, like Google or Bing. Google the company. Visit their website, but also look for news releases they’ve published (these can spotlight new products and services that might lead to new job opportunities in the near future), and links to trade industries and other sources that can give you additional insight into the

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The bad news about applying for advertised positions is that many of them don’t actually exist. Many online job postings are from companies THINKING about hiring, work-at-home schemes, insurance sales, or worse – phishing trips and scams. In fact, your chances of landing a position advertised online is about 3 percent. The good news is you can also use your resume to apply for unadvertised

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By investing in a professionally written resume, you’re already positioned yourself ahead of other job seekers. But don’t let that advantage go to waste. Now that you have your resume, what should you do with it? This series of posts will give you strategies for what you can — and should — do with your resume to maximize your chances of finding and securing your next job.

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The most obvious reason you might need a resume is that you’re looking for a job. However, there are many other reasons you might want to put together a resume now, even if you’re not seeking new employment. Your job changes: Your employment situation can change in a heartbeat — the company may be acquired, sold, or go out of business. A great boss may leave

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At first glance, her goal seemed out of reach. She was a military spouse who had been home raising her children for 15 years. Her home hadn’t even stayed in one place as her family had followed her husband around the world, so she had few long-term roots anywhere. Her training and early career in IT were sadly out of date, and she wasn’t interested

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LinkedIn expert Sandy Zeiszler says LinkedIn now offers Weekly Search appearances that are invaluable for job seekers. With Weekly Search, a job seeker can see which companies are viewing their profile. Here’s what it looks like: “These are amazing tools, but only if you use them to follow up with companies and learn more about how you might be able to help them,” Sandy said. How

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Career Thought Leaders recently shared these five data points on the importance of social profiles. 70% of employers use social media to screen candidates. 57% are less likely to interview a candidate they can’t find online. 54% have decided not to hire a candidate based on their social media profiles. 92% of recruiters use social media in their outreach; 55% use Facebook, 87% use LinkedIn.

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